The cross Kirkland corridor is a haven for walkers and bikers and a habitat for suburban wildlife, and we need to ensure that it stays that way. Sound Transit plans to destroy our treasure by building a light rail line straight through our quiet neighborhood. Please join this group to support preservation of the trail and hold the transit authority accountable in constructing the tracks next to I-405, where they belong.

  • Tim W posted a photo in the group Save Our Trail May 7, 2019 4:01 pm

    The Anna’s Hummingbirds are pairing up and roosting adjacent to the trail for the Spring mating season. It is comforting to know that a few survived the ten days of below freezing temperatures in February which is rare for the Seattle-metro area. hummer1

    The Anna’s Hummingbirds are pairing up and roosting adjacent to the trail for the Spring matin
  • Tim W posted an update in the group Group logo of Save Our TrailSave Our Trail October 3, 2018 5:56 pm · 

    The migratory bird species are back for the Autumn transition, as the trail provides a shelter from the bitter cold. Damp and cool is more preferable to frozen winds.

  • Tim W posted 4 photos in the group Save Our Trail September 3, 2018 8:51 pm

    One of the most serene and beautiful locations on the planet as a late Summer sunset left enough light to capture scenic vistas and the lush greenbelt. IMG_3280IMG_3279IMG_3276IMG_3272

    One of the most serene and beautiful locations on the planet as a late Summer sunset left enough ligOne of the most serene and beautiful locations on the planet as a late Summer sunset left enough ligOne of the most serene and beautiful locations on the planet as a late Summer sunset left enough ligOne of the most serene and beautiful locations on the planet as a late Summer sunset left enough lig
  • Tim W posted an update in the group Group logo of Save Our TrailSave Our Trail August 25, 2018 3:32 pm · 

    Dreary skies are the result of damaging environmental policy in the management of Canadian wildfires. Thank you for the liberal gift in effecting those of us, who ironically enjoy the outdoors.

  • Tim W posted an update in the group Group logo of Save Our TrailSave Our Trail July 12, 2018 8:13 pm · 

    The Cabbage White and Woodland Skipper butterflies have arrived and will compete with the foraging Italian honey bees and various bumble bee species for nectar.

    • 2 people like this.
    • Bombus melanopygus, Bombus mixtus (most common), and Bombus Vosensenskii all frequent the foliage adjacent to the trail.

  • Tim W posted 4 photos in the group Save Our Trail July 4, 2018 7:58 pm

    A vibrant and wonderful family walk on a marbled sky muggy Independence Day in Kirkland. The Summer foliage is officially in bloom. IMG_3057IMG_3060IMG_3053IMG_3056

    A vibrant and wonderful family walk on a marbled sky muggy Independence Day in Kirkland. The Summer A vibrant and wonderful family walk on a marbled sky muggy Independence Day in Kirkland. The Summer A vibrant and wonderful family walk on a marbled sky muggy Independence Day in Kirkland. The Summer A vibrant and wonderful family walk on a marbled sky muggy Independence Day in Kirkland. The Summer
  • Tim W posted an update in the group Group logo of Save Our TrailSave Our Trail July 2, 2018 4:35 pm · 

    Bird species spotted in Summer 2018 (call the ornithologist) White Crowned Sparrow, Song Sparrow, Bewick’s Wren, Anna’s Hummingbird, Pileated Woodpecker, Stellar’s Jay, American Robin, Northern Flicker, Towhee, Junco, California Quail, Bald Eagle, and Chickadee.

  • Gusee posted an update in the group Group logo of Save Our TrailSave Our Trail June 26, 2018 5:16 pm · 

    While the Monarchs are a rare site because of the removal of milkweed, the Western Tiger Swallowtails are literally thriving and watching their random dance of pollination is always a joyous experience.

  • Tim W posted an update in the group Group logo of Save Our TrailSave Our Trail June 21, 2018 8:34 pm · 

    The sleek aerial display of the Little Brown Bat debuts at twilight every evening, as the dark skies become fervid insect hunting grounds.

  • Tim W created the doc OfficialTrail Map in the group Group logo of Save Our TrailSave Our Trail June 21, 2018 8:30 pm · 

  • Bill posted an update in the group Group logo of Save Our TrailSave Our Trail June 20, 2018 3:20 am · 

    How about a map?

  • Tim W posted an update in the group Group logo of Save Our TrailSave Our Trail May 31, 2018 8:15 pm · 

    Encountered a juvenile garter snake and mallard couple have decided to nest in standing water adjacent to the trail. Summer is almost here and ducklings are on their way.

  • Tim W posted an update in the group Group logo of Save Our TrailSave Our Trail May 25, 2018 4:28 pm · 

    The Pileated Woodpecker family has decided to nest near the 52nd street trailhead. Suburban green belts work in conjunction with sensible planning.

  • Gusee posted an update in the group Group logo of Save Our TrailSave Our Trail May 10, 2018 9:29 pm · 

    Sound Transit- The 50 Billion dollar clone of the Big Dig that will bleed the tax payer dry and usher in the purposeful homeless population. Thankfully, the Kirkland cops actually throw them out of town and they do not pollute the trail with their shit and needles.

    • 1 person likes this.
    • Yeah- When the only issue is yelling at people for not having any sort of light or reflective clothing at night, you know things are going well.

  • Tim W posted an update in the group Group logo of Save Our TrailSave Our Trail May 3, 2018 8:19 pm · 

    May always brings throngs of outdoor enthusiasts to the heart of Kirkland. It was difficult to maintain 17mph with all the traffic and the South wind. Tough, but manageable.

  • Tim W posted an update in the group Group logo of Save Our TrailSave Our Trail April 26, 2018 8:57 pm · 

    What a day in the Seattle area and on the trail with an abundance of sunlight and 82 degrees at 5pm. Shh. Tell ’em it rains here everyday. Birds species of note spotted today included, song sparrows, bewick’s wrens, anna’s hummingbirds, white-crowned sparrows, stellar’s jays, and spotted towhees.

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